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of you in the back -- i will read it for you. bob actually said in an interview, "the united states both economically and mill tarle and also in terms of its overall influence is really is as strong as its ever been." he said this on february 21, 2012. do you agree with the assertion that right now or in 2012 the united states is as strong as it has ever been? >> it depends, david, if you are speaking about strong relative to whom. i think it is true we are still the most emulated in the world. but it is possible to be the world's cleanest dirty shirt. so i sort of america as going back to -- i have to answer this in a little bit of detail. in terms of, one of the things that made us strong to start with, and i would argue, that we actually had a formula for success in this country. one, we educate our people up to and beyond what the technology was, so they can get the most out of it. whether it was universal secondary education, and then it was universal post secondary education. second, we have the world's best infrastructure. roads, railroads, third, we have the world's most immigrat
in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss. >> and so your position is it was waived? >> yes. >> but it was not adjudicated. is there -- >> it was not adjudicated in this case. our position, it was waived when it was not raised in a rule 12 motion. >> what effects that commenced in the united states or that are closely related to the united states exist between what happened here and what happened in nigeria? >> the only connection between the events in nigeria and the united states is that the plaintiffs are now living in the united states and have asylum because of those events, and the defendants are here. there's no other connection between the events that took place in
coverage of the debate. fareed zakaria gdp is next for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is gps the global public square. welcome to awe of you around the united states and the world. i'm fareed zakaria. first up, kofi annan. the former secretary-general of the united nations and. i'll ask him whether there's any end in sight for that nation's brutal war, then the u.s. isn't the only major power picking a president for the next few weeks. i'll talk with beijing's reporter e van osnos. also i'll talk to the education innovator sal khan, the founder of khan academy about how best to teach our kids. >>> and what does a company with almost 700 planes and tens of thousands of trucks worry about? fuel. i'll sit down with fedex ceo fred smith to talk about the future of energy. that crucial subject, the future of energy is also at the heart of our latest gps special which airs tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. in global lessons, the roadmap for powering america will take you around the world to bring you ideas about energy back home. >>> but first here's my take. the
for the president of the united states. mitt romney is laying out his foreign policy platform in just about 20 minutes from now and we have the live cameras trained at the virginia military institute. will you hear him as he takes to the mic and possibly a global audience. you will hear it here on cnn and from our unmatched team of correspondents and analysts from d.c. to beijing to beirut. we have you completely covered and we'll begin with wolf blitz inner washington. when it comes to foreign policy credibility, the obama camp is comparing mitt romney to chevy chase and our most recent poll shows voters give the president a 7-point edge on world affairs. is a challenger, any challenger, be it mitt romney or anyone else, obliged to do this, obliged to become the commander in chief like more a moment and give a foreign policy speech right before the election? >> yes. mitt romney has been aggressively pursuing the foreign policy area because he thinks the president is vulnerable. yes, the president did manage to kill osama bin laden on his watch, but in certain other areas the romney folks if y
's iraq, the first shia arab led state in history is iraq, but we never mention that. the united states cannot come to terms with the fact today that for the first time america and one of america's key regional pillars, egypt, is in place strategically. you doesn't mean they have to become pro-iranian. they are just in play. they're no longer reflective pro-american the iranian military the first time in 30 years can go through the suez. iran doesn't need syria anymore. american elites have a very hard time coming to terms with these facts. and an even harder time coming to terms with the reality that the arab awakening is accelerating erosion of american standing and position in the middle east, not iran's. but rather than face this reality, americans embrace, particularly elites here in washington, embrace the logic defined proposition that the same drivers of political change and powering islamists in arab countries will somehow transform the islamic republic into a secular liberal state. it is a logic defying proposition. still, reality is what it is. on the eve of 9/11, just over 1
who has a remarkable story about death in iraq and reunion in the united states. >> the i interviewed a guy in the peace, a psychiatrist who used the term moral injury and he said a lot of soldiers and marines stuff from moral injury, which he described as sort of it happens when you get an order, you do something that you believe at the time was absolutely correct and the only thing you could do, and it turns out to have been, to have terrible consequences. that is basically what happened here. >> rose: american foreign policy and a dexter filkins story. when we come back. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. additional funding provided by these funders. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with the 2012 election last night, president obama and mitt romney balanced it out in the third and final debate. at lynn university in boca raton florida, the suggest was foreign policy but discussion often veered toward domestic concerns as well, the two men addressed a range o
is running for the united states senate. you know very well by plan is my own. i have sought the expert opinions of those outside to get the brightest and the best and every word of that plan has been cited either in the online plan or in print. when you got into this race as the democrats at the thought -- as a democrat and you thought is going to be a coronation and now you are in a serious race with a serious woman. >> we're going to move on to the next question. >> in this tide of rising national debt, i was wondering about congressional earmarked. do you support elimination of them? here is one -- $1.9 million for a water taxi to pleasure beach in bridgeport. >> first call me respond to this last allegation. there is no doubt we'll look at her jobs plan, there are entire paragraphs and sentences lifted from the house republican website, from the cato institute. i don't know what you call it, but all i am saying is this is not a plan rooted in what best for the state of connecticut. this is a plan written by people in washington. when that mcmahon's idea that by simply giving a bunc
to accept the right of a sovereign state, a member of the united nations as a viable state, a state which is legitimate, is unacceptable from any point of view. from any aspect and angle whatsoever. we cannot accept the iranians will be allowed to legitimize another state whatever it is. and certainly not from our point of view not israel. they will have swallow two bitter pills not one. one pill will be the pill of the threat nuclear threat and the other will be the threat of accepting israel right to exist. despite the rhetoric we are hearing from teheran, i believe that many iranians in places of power understand that israel is here to stay. they realize that israel not going disappear as it will not disappear. and therefore, they will have to come terms with this reality. and these two elements means to say in order to achieve the aim, you have to find ways of giving them what did i say a few minutes ago? to resort to the use of dignity. it's a different good thing to do. it's very difficult. i'm not saying it's going to be easy. i think it's something we have to do. because we have t
in an interview the united states both economically and militarily and also in terms of its overall influence, really is as strong as it's ever been. he said this on february 21st, 2012 in case you want to pinpoint at least that statement. tom, do you agree with the assertion that right now or in 2012 the united states is as strong as it's ever been? >> that depends, david come if you were speaking about strong, relative in to houma? and in what area. i think there is no question in terms of influence. and on the global stage where the country that is most emulated in the world. but it is possible as mohammed said the world's cleanest dirty shirt also. and so come on a really prefer to think about american strength and i have to answer this question in a little bit of detail in terms of what are the things that have made us strong to start with? and i would argue that we had a formula for success in this country and was built on five pillars. one was educate our people love to and beyond what the technology was so we could get the most out of it. so it was universal primary education, the fac
number one. united states is richer on a per capita basis by a magnitude of about tenfold, but china will have more economic output than the united states. it is a force that has to be reckoned with. they got this way because they have had very good growth for a number of years, but it is growing a little bit too strong. there are some small bubbles popping up in different parts of their economy, and they are trying to slow down the economy. slowing down an economy -- every government can do that. the hard part is controlling that downward trajectory. in most cases, countries that tried to slow down their economy -- they go into a crash, they go into a recession, but china is different. the best way i have to describe china's economy, to steal a line from yogi berra is one-half market economy and three- quarters centralize control economy. they are big enough. they are powerful enough that they can probably pull this off. we will have to see how it happens, but that is an important thing for the world economy. europe, on the other hand, is another story. if you believe in
of the book is that these state business networks exist in every society, even in the united states, and they are usually, usually, not always, but usually corrupt and problematic, and they siphon off a lot of money, however, in some countries, there's checks and balances placed on the networks, much more so than others. in a place like syria, these checks and balances were not sufficient to check the networks anywhere in the world to prevent them from running into the ground. >> host: can you give us an example, the network of the u.s., how it exists? >> guest: after the invasion of iraq, one of the major construction or reconstruction quote-on-quote ventures was, you know, commissioned somehow or given somehow to various corporations that are very much in touch or close to or part of the network, for instance, vice president dick cheney, whether it's haliburton, other countries, ended up unfairly taking up the ventures, and, actually, they didn't do a good job at all as a virtue of the results we saw years later. they ended on scandals, and other kinds of such networks. if you'd l
a distinguished career in publish service as a lawyer in arkansas, as a first lady of the united states and more recently as the united states senator from the state of new york. she not only has the highest approval rating of any member of the u.s. cabinet, she has as well topped the gallop poll for 16 years as the most admired woman in the world besting the previous record of eleanor roosevelt who held the title for only 13 years. as america continues to engage in north africa, we are extremely fortunate to be served by a public servant who is engaged in these challenges day in and day out, who cares deeply about the issues and how they effect america's interest and who believes in a brighter future for the people of the middle east. please join me in welcoming the secretary of state, the honorable hillary clinton. [applause] >> thank you. thank you all. thank you very much and a special word of thanks to a friend and someone whom i admire greatly. his many years of distinguished service to our country is a great tribute in every respect. thanks also to john and csis for hosting this conferenc
of the united states or i am without a seat. [laughter] i have no intention of standing. [laughter] >> i must say i have traveled to banquet circuits for years. i never understood the logistics of dinners like this and how the absence of one individual could cause three of us not to have seats. [laughter] >> vice president, i'm glad to see you here tonight. you said you want to give america back to the little guy. [laughter] mr. president, i am that man. [laughter] >> as i looked out at the ties this evening, i realize i have not seen so many people so well-dressed since i went to a come-as-you-are party. >> a lot of good news from yugoslavia, there's one less name for me to remember. [laughter] [applause] >> you know what this world really needs? it really needs more world leaders named al smith. [laughter] >> it is an honor to share the dias with a descendent of al smith. your great grandfather was my favorite kind of governor. [laughter] the kind who ran for president and lost. [laughter] >> all of that al smith program at c-span.org/thecontenders, and tonight's dinner starting at 9 p.m. e
. is in the interest of the united states to solve this and get a two-state solution to this? various members of this current administration have said so, and if that's true it would be good to succeed. there are others who are not so sure that it's achievable of that political capital is worth spending on a. that's an important question, important decision for the next administration is the next president wants to do this, he's going to have to build a domestic constituency to overcome opposition. on the question of the iran syria hezbollah act, the administration will have decisions to make about sanctions, about diplomacy, about war. if the iranian regime comes to the table with serious intent, for any reason, either because sanctions are fighting so hard or because they are threats of military strike, or for any other reason, my question as an individual is with the american government take yes for an answer, or will the american government have conditions that are, cannot be met by the other side? and with the administration even consider what was previously called grand bargain, which w
in order for us to invest in the united states and create jobs. >> we've got some good role models even though this roundtable -- business roundtable doesn't get involved and we don't even great legislators. my expense as a governor is a competitive state, our best teachers on political activist with the labor unions, and then later on george soros. he taught every wealthy individual american you can't afford to sit on the sidelines. and so i say go for it. >> we don't do endorsements either. we have a pack. we're very involved, and last week we launch a retail meets the vote campaign and will probably connect wit with a quar of a million retailers and millions of their employees. not endorsing, not to do that would give them voter guide, encouraging them to be in full. if we're going to address any of the issues, maybe we can get something done everything looks exactly the same. but there's a sense of people of a better understanding of our positions there's a greater likelihood we will get some action on them and that's why we've engaged our membership. >> let's go to questions from t
my life to continue that work is your united states senator. >> moderator: thank you. we hope this debate has subfolders as they ponder their decision and a selection only urge you to vote on election day. what you think our candidates, chris murphy and linda mcmahon and our reporter panel, al terzi, dennis house, keisha grant and mark davis if i could have your attention,e program on manufacturing society in the 21st century here at the institute. i welcome you on behalf of the institute both in the audience and those viewing remotely. i wanted to ask our president, walter isaacson, just to say a few words. it's always dangerous when your boss knows as much or more about the subject matter. >> that is definitely not true and that is why it is a pleasure to have tom here at the aspen institute because the one thing we do know about the issue of manufacturing is how important it is to america's economy and how ridiculous it is to try to think of a great economy that doesn't always have a healthy manufacturing sector. and so, when we were looking at the aspen institute and all t
of the united states ought not accept any soviet control over eastern europe. we ought to deal with each of these countries separately. we ought to pursue strategies with each of them, economic and the rest, that help them pull away from their dependence upon the soviet union. where the soviet union has acted irresponsibly, as they have in many of those countries, especially, recently, in poland, i believe we ought to insist that western credits extended to the soviet union bear the market rate. make the soviets pay for their irresponsibility. that is a very important objective -- to make certain that we continue to look forward to progress toward greater independence by these nations and work with each of them separately. >> mr. president, your rebuttal. >> yes. i'm not going to continue trying to respond to these repetitions of the falsehoods that have already been stated here. but with regard to whether mr. mondale would be strong, as he said he would be, i know that he has a commercial out where he's appearing on the deck of the nimitz and watching the f- 14's take off. and that's an
this serious occur in an administration and have a president of the united states in a situation like this say he didn't know? a president must know these things. i don't know which is worse, not knowing or knowing and not stopping it. and what about the mining of the harbors in nicaragua which violated international law? this has hurt this country, and a president's supposed to command. >> mr. president, your rebuttal. >> yes. i have so many things there to respond to, i'm going to pick out something you said earlier. you've been all over the country repeating something that, i will admit, the press has also been repeating-that i believed that nuclear misses could be fired and then called back. i never, ever conceived of such a thing. i never said any such thing. in a discussion of our strategic arms negotiations, i said that submarines carrying ssiles and airplanes carrying missiles we more conventional- type weapons, not as destabilizing as the land-based missiles, and that they were also weapons that -- or carriers-that if they were sent out and there was a change, you could call them back
in the united states, christians love jesus but so do buddhists and jews and hindus and people without any religion whatsoever. >> the jesus image is multiadaptble because we are a 3489 religious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put jesus on the national agenda andn people of all different religions and without anyt all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began your book with? >> well, presumably it's no because he didn't have anything else to do, i mean, he was a pretty busy guy in the white house but he ordered a couple books from england, a couple bibles and he sat there in the white house and he cut and pasted and took out the miracles and took out the resurrection. he believed jesus was a good guy, he believed he was one of the most important philosophers ever but he didn't like christianity and he was able to separate out christianity from jesus, say no to christianity and say yes to yeast. >> ho
that it goes unremarked upon. if you want to know about a country look at the map of the united states in terms of the harbors from the east coast of the united states, the 13 colonies jam packed with natural harbors. the coast of africa collectively few good natural harbors but the east coast was packed with them and the continental corporation of the u.s. was the last resource rich part of the ten per zone the european enlightenment with inland waterways flowing in a convenient east west fashion than the west the caressed combined and our ideas and dhaka sees but because of where we happen to live as well that's why these things matter. why these things matter. they've allowed india and china to develop into the completely distinct great worlds of civilization we have much to do with each other through long periods of history. >> let's take that image that you've offered of america, this place with all these great natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave it to the development of what we think of as the united states. it wasn't
in pakistan, 75% of the pakistani to identify the united states now as their enemy, not as their supporter or their allies. in many ways, we are seeing a very ill-conceived, irresponsible, and immoral or policy come back to haunt us where the united states foreign policies have been based, unfortunate, on brute military force and wars for oil. under my administration, we will have a foreign policy based on international law and human rights and the use of diplomacy. instead of fighting wars for oil, we will be leading, as america, a leading the fight to put an end to climate change. in afghanistan and iraq, we have spent about $5 trillion. we have seen thousands and thousands of american lives lost, hundreds of thousands of civilian lives lost, about $1 trillion a year being spent on a massive, bloated military, industrial security budget. instead, we need to cut the military budget, right sizes year 2000 levels, and build a true secured here at home, bringing our war dollars home. >> rocky anderson from the justice the party, yet two minutes. >> the question was whether the killings of th
hearing postponed. >> it in a stunning comeback over the united states, -- >> it in a stunning comeback over the united states, europe -- >> in a stunning comeback over the united states, europe clinched the ryder cup. >> georgia could be set for a post-election standoff. both the ruling party and opposition coalition are claiming victory. >> the former soviet republic has claimed that exit polls give the opposition an edge, but the government claims it will retain its majority. >> opposition supporters have taken to the streets to celebrate victory. georgians went to the polls against a backdrop of prison abuse, a scandal that has damaged the once-popular government of mikhail saakashvili. his name rivals -- his main rival was to move the country into russia. it is not clear when the outcome will be known. let's go live to our reporter following the ballot in georgia. some confusion about the outcome, with both major groups claiming victory. do you have any further details? >> these elections have been a close race from the beginning. what we now hear from tbilisi, is that these electi
-american to attend university explains why race remains a crucial issue in the united states. >> south korean pop star has a u.k. number one. if you haven't heard it, hear this. >> the ridiculously catchy tune with its overtop video has become a global phenomenon. ♪ >> the song, what exactly is gangham style? >> it doesn't have any meaning actually. i'm just saying gangham style which doesn't have that much meaning. it's about some lady and some guys, you know -- >> the video has been viewed on youtube more than 300 million times. has more likes than any other in history. and despite being a self-parody has been affectionately spoofed by the thai navy, a gruche californian lifeguards. -- group of californian lifeguards and even prisoners in a jail. it's the latest in a long line of viral chart hits. remember this one? >> ♪ >> and what about the crazy frogs? but this is one has been more successful worldwide. when you play the song on the radio, people seem to quite like the song because it's catchy. normally with a novelty song like this people hate the song but quite like the video. this wor
that are investing right here in iowa, right here in the united states of america, rebuilding our manufacturing. [applause] i want to control more of our own energy. you heard last night oil production is up, natural gas production is up. we'vee've also said is got to develop a new source of energy and we've got to be more fisht with our economy. so we raised fuel efficiency on cars so your car will go twice as far on a gallon of gas. we had double the amount of renewable energy we generate from wind and solar and buy fuels. today the united states of america is less dependent on foreign oil than any time in the last two decades. so the question -- so the choice you have -- you heard last night, it's not a choice between oil versus solar or natural gas versus wind. we all agree we got to increase oil production and natural gas production. but the question is whether we build on the progress for the new energy source of the future. i'm not going to keep on giving corporate tax funded welfare to oil companies $4 billion a year when we could use that money to promote wind and solar and long-lastin
and halted travel and flooded entire neighborhoods. at least 40 people were killed in the united states. >>> sandy transitioned from a hurricane to a post-tropical cyclone by the time it hit shore. most people had never seen anything like it. the center of the storm, now over southern ontario moving east. it's left a trail of destruction. a power station in manhattan exploded on monday during the height of the storm cutting electricity to much of the borough. reuters reports at least 8 million peoples and businesses across several states are still without electricity. new yorkers can get around more easily now that buses are running again. but city officials say it will take at least a week to restore rail, water and other services. sandy has been losing strength since monday. its maximum momentary wind speed is around 65 kilometers per hour. the storm has pulled a mass of cold air from the north. snow is falling across eight states. some areas got more than 60 centimeters. and sandy's impact isn't just financial. the u.s. media has been looking at the political ramifications. the presi
>>> this is "gps," the global public square. welcome to all of you in the united states and around the world, i'm fareed zakaria. the debates have done, the race is heading for the final stretch, and it is still all about the economy. so we'll start with a great panel it to see talk about the american economy, who is actually going on. >>> then, you've often heard that fracking is controversial. why? we have a debate to help you think it through. >>> and do you think you have enough money? what would be enough? we'll have a fascinating discussion on the subject with lord robert skidelsky, britain's most prominent economic historian o how to answer those questions. >>> and why in the world did the nation of mali get more mention this week in the debate than all of japan, mexico, or europe? >>> first, my take. the international monetary fund's latest world economic outlook makes for gloomy roading. growth projections have been revised downward almost everywhere, especially in europe and the big emerging markets like china. yet when looking out over the next four years, coincidentally
at that point, bun of the biggest banks in the united states. things vice president changed. not in major terms of the bank. should be working for the bank as a whole. for the customer they shouldn't be seeking big rewards in themselves. contrast that to what goes on themselves. tremendous part of the conversation not just in bonuses. compared to what they would have been 20 or 25 years ago. no what kind of climate does that create? they get to elaborate a little bit. people who criticize this rule, they are sure to speculative access. infact, a lot of things are at the heart of the banking crisis. why did that go wild? i would argue that the kpep sags practices crept in into trading parts of the bank. so the lending offices said, how can hay make a lot of money and get a big bonus? over simplifying a little bit. it's true. the chairman of the citi bank. the biggest bank. a couple of trillion dollar banks. he said to me, we put these two different kinds of organizations together and it different work. and it's a cultural problem. you didn't just regular rate the losses. it created a tension in
legislature. but i'm also a serious guy. i think the presidency of the united states is a very serious office, and i think we have to address these issues in a very serious way. so i hope and expect that i will be liked by the people of this country as president of the united states. i certainly hope i will be liked by them on the 8th of november. [laughter] but i also think it's important to be somebody who is willing to make those tough choices. now, we have just heard two or three times from the vice president he's not going to raise taxes. i repeat, within days after you made that pledge, you broke it. you said, well, maybe as a last resort we'll do it. and you supported legislation this year that's involved tax increases not once, but twice. so that pledge isn't realistic, and i think the vice president knows it. i think the people of this country know it. the fact of the matter is that the next president of the united states is going to have to go to the white house seriously, he is going to have to work with the congress seriously. he can't turn to the congress and blame them for the f
, the united states has made all these mistakes, kind of like a colonial power down through the years. >> right. >> obama spends a lot of time apologizing for america. do you think that will come out in the debate tonight? >> i hope so. romney has shown an ability to be very tough debater while still being very kind. it's a nice combo platter he has, but you have with obama the guy who denied american exceptionalism. we're the only non-imperialist superpower in the history of the world. is he unaware of that? oh, yes, i'm sure english, they think they are exceptional, too. that was his response to american exceptionalism. you had him bowing for all of the world leaders. you had him leading from behind during the arab spring which these guys were so enthusiastic about, and we see the result of it, with the death of our ambassador and three other americans. no, obama's view is not that america is an exceptional country, and i hope that does come out. >> steve mcmahon, we could have actually landed troops in benghazi. that is now coming out. the president actually met with leon panetta, and nothin
is the chief executive officer of the united states. whoever the next president is, they need to demonstrate extraordinary presidential leadership. they need to use the power of the presidency to go to the american people, as ross perot did in 1992, to build a case that we are on a burning platform, to help them understand that everything has to be on the table, to provide principles and a framework for action, and to call the first three words of the constitution "we the people" to work with the president to solve the problem, because if you do not keep the economy strong, everything will suffer over time -- job opportunities, domestic tranquility. >> did you feel in 1992 and 1996, that we can get out of our deficits, and we ran four years of surpluses, prior to 9/11 and other things that happened in the last decade. did you think we had solved our problems? >> no, we were just lucky where weaver going through a good time. now we are any time of bad luck. i would really impressed if our president would take this issue right now and explain to the american people what he is going to do, beca
am running for the united states senate. to change the want leadership in washington. we can change that. that is why i am running for the senate. i want to pass a balanced budget. i am not your usual politician. i'm not one of the good old boys pay ed i will make this tough decisions in the united states senate. i will roll up my sleeves, work hard for you, and i will fight for you. >> now the opening statement from bob kerrey. >> thank you. i love nebraska. i always have and i always will. i was born here in lincoln. i left nebraska and went to war and came home, and i recovered from illness in the lincoln. i started a business that employed more than 700 people. i served as your governor, balancing our budget, and i left after four years and went back to business. i served as your son that -- as your senator, and again we balance our budget. i am a candidate for congress for the senate because congress needs to change, and i will fight to make that happen. i have never had and never will be a cookie cutter politician. i never have and never will be anything other than someone who
assistance today, we will be able to take a broad look at how the arab world is looking at the united states and the u.s. public is looking at the arab world as the arab awakening continues to create a very uncertain and very fast changing environment. so, i am grateful to all of you for coming and look forward to our discussion and at this point i would like to invite shibley telhami to the podium to present the poll. >> thanks a lot, tammie. it's always great to be here. i'm going to just present not the whole thing but some of the findings so we can get on with the conversation i will present a highlight. i just want to give you a little bit of a picture about this particular poll. it was conducted by knowledge networks sample of 737 that is designed to be a national representative in an internet panel. the methodology is described in the information that we will put all and is also available online. i also want to say that it's really my pleasure and honor to partner to the sinnott program at the university of maryland, and a program for policy international policy attitudes and particul
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 886 (some duplicates have been removed)